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Stop. Grammar time!
Grammar time
theamyrlin
You know what kind of annoys? When people spell out the plural of someone's last name and they use an apostrophe. For example, "I like to hang out with the Robinson's." And even though it is maybe a little awkward to look at, the plural of Williams is Williamses, so just get used to it. Also, it's never a good idea to use an apostrophe to pluralize anything. If you do this, and no one tells you to stop, it's because maybe you are intimidating, or maybe no one really likes you enough to stop you from looking like a total idiot in print. This public service announcement isn't even directed at any one person. I just started thinking about it today, and I thought, "I should post about this, you know, for posterity." Yes, I definitely need to let the future generations know about my nerdy, insane, grammar quirkiness.
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I thought it should be Robinsons' because you're actually saying that you want to go to the Robinsons' place/house. And in that case I was taught that both Robinsons' and Robinsons's is correct.


It would, except for in the example you want to hang out with the Robinsons, not with their house. But, if you were going over to their place, it would definitely be Robinsons'. :-)

Ah yes. Reading comprehension for the win.

It more than kind of annoys me. I see it all over, and it's really not that difficult to figure out. Lazy lazy lazy.

THANK YOU.

I would also like to announce that when a single person's last name ends in "s," it is okay to go ahead and put an apostrophe "s" at the end of his name to make it possessive, i.e., "Gus's," "James's," etc. Not Gus'. YOU HEAR THAT, FANFIC WRITERS? The only exception is when you're talking about Jesus, Moses, or another ancient historical figure like Ramses or Zeus or whatever. Thank you, and good night.

it's never a good idea to use an apostrophe to pluralize anything.
Oh my god, just reading that in a sentence made me twitch.

I approve of your grammar PSA.

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